Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, Columbus, Ohio

Sunday Drives

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Last weekend we stayed close to home and visited a nearby site in Columbus, Ohio. Franklin Park Conservatory & Botanical Gardens is a beautiful testament to the Progressive Era’s emphasis on conservation of the natural environment.The location itself makes you feel relaxed, as you are surrounded by natural beauty and impressive architecture.

You can bring yourself to visit this location just to appreciate the architecture alone.  The original building consists of the Palm House and Davis Showhouse. The Palm house features palm species from around the world.

According to the conservatory’s website, “the design of this grand Victorian-style glass greenhouse, built in 1895, was influenced by the success of Chicago’s World Fair and Columbian Exposition in 1893 and inspired by the City Beautiful movement.” Later additions were matched to resemble the older style.

The conservatory is divided into sections based on geography and environment…

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Aviation Tour, Dayton, Ohio

 

 

Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, Columbus, Ohio

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Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Last weekend we stayed close to home and visited a nearby site in Columbus, Ohio. Franklin Park Conservatory & Botanical Gardens is a beautiful testament to the Progressive Era’s emphasis on conservation of the natural environment.The location itself makes you feel relaxed, as you are surrounded by natural beauty and impressive architecture.

You can bring yourself to visit this location just to appreciate the architecture alone.  The original building consists of the Palm House and Davis Showhouse. The Palm house features palm species from around the world.

According to the conservatory’s website, “the design of this grand Victorian-style glass greenhouse, built in 1895, was influenced by the success of Chicago’s World Fair and Columbian Exposition in 1893 and inspired by the City Beautiful movement.” Later additions were matched to resemble the older style.

The conservatory is divided into sections based on geography and environment. During our visit in September, a special exhibit, “Topiaries at the Conservatory: Wild Wonders” featured plant sculptures of elephants and giraffes.  My kids really appreciated the whimsical nature of the animals; it was reminiscent of the sculptures at Epcot during the garden show.

From there, we found a kids play area in the middle with kids’ farmer’s market stand.  Our little one really enjoyed playing store with her sister.

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One unique feature is that the conservatory exhibits renowned glass artwork by Dale Chihuly.  This glasswork is probably one of the most beautiful glass displays I have seen, comparable to those in Venice, Italy.  The glass is incorporated into the actual walkways of the botanical gardens, adding a beautiful contrast to the natural displays.  The vibrant colors and beautiful shapes of the colorful glassworks seem to add the feel of moving water to the gardens as you walk through.  According to his website, Chihuly’s art focuses on the avant garde use of glass, which adds a new dimension to this medium.  The conservatory features a glass blowing studio and here you can observe a demonstration of glass making at various times during the day.

After appreciating the glass, we ventured on to the butterfly conservatory.   The tour begins with a view of the butterfly larvae at various stages of development.  The girls stopped to view the cocoons before entering the butterfly conservatory.

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Inside we found a beautiful pathway of plants and were at liberty to explore and observe the various species.  New butterflies are released at certain times in the day, and during this time we were lucky to see a great deal of butterflies flying around.  The butterfly expert explained the various species in depth, as she released them.  The girls really enjoyed being able to delicately hold some of the butterflies as they flew on their hands.

One of the most impressive parts of this site, are the outdoor gardens surrounding the property.  The gardens provide a perfect spot to walk around with our family on a Sunday afternoon.  I would recommend going on a breezy day, as the heat prevented us from enjoying the gardens more fully.  Overall, our trip to the conservatory was a great way to explore history, art and nature with our kids.

Put-In-Bay Island, Ohio

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Put-In-Bay is one of the Midwest’s weirdly unique places. It is actually an island on Lake Erie, just off the coast of Sandusky, Ohio. The area is home to Cedar Point, the largest amusement park in Ohio, a popular summer destination for families. If you are visiting the area, the island of Put-In-Bay has interesting historical significance to explore on a day trip. The name of the island is said to come from its use by sailors in the late 1700’s to wait out storms on Lake Erie, hence “Put-In-Bay”.

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NATIONAL PARK MONUMENT – PERRY’S VICTORY & INTERNATIONAL PEACE MEMORIAL

The highlight of the island is, “Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial.” According the National Park Service website, “the Memorial, a Doric column, rising 352 feet over Lake Erie is situated 5 miles from the longest undefended border in the world.” It is the nation’s 3rd tallest National Monument and world’s most massive Doric column, commemorating the long standing peace between Great Britain, Canada and the United States.  American sailors were stationed on Put-In-Bay during the War of 1812, and won the Battle of Lake Erie against the British.  At its base, lie the remains of three British officers and three United States officers.  Carved in the stone rotunda are the names of those who were lost in the battle. The monument is the only international monument in the National Park Service and the world’s most massive Doric column.

DETOUR IN AVON, OHIO

 

We began our stay with a detour, an hour away in Avon, Ohio outside of Cleveland. The Residence Inn there is new, with a modern kitchen, very spacious rooms, and a good sized indoor pool. The town of Avon was hosting an Art Fair at a mixed shopping development, and we were able to take advantage of our trip to see local artisanal crafts and have a lovely dinner.  I would highly recommend the city of Avon if you want to avoid the crowds of Sandusky and are interested in a more laid-back weekend trip that does not include the amusement park.  Sandusky hosts many hotels and some have indoor water parks, so if you are looking for those types of activities stay closer to Put-In-Bay.

FERRY RIDE

 

On the morning drive, we took a local road from Avon to the ferry port.  There are two options to get the Lake Erie islands in this area.  One is Miller Ferry, the main commuter ferry, which is less expensive, costing $7 per adult and $1.50 per child over 6 years old for a one way ticket.  The Miller ferry runs every 30 minutes in the summer until 9pm.  This ferry allows you to take your car at certain times, but you won’t need it.  Most people rent a Golf-cart to get around the island, and our kids loved this idea. The downside of the Miller ferry is that it leaves you on the less “touristy” south side of the island, but since the island is small this is a small inconvenience.

 

We wanted a faster boat, so we opted for the more expensive option of the Jet-Express to make for a more exciting ride.  The Jet Express leaves from both Sandusky and Port Clinton.  If you are visiting the amusement park at Cedar Point, there is also an option directly from the park.  If you have time, you also buy a ticket that includes the neighboring  Kelly’s Island.  The cost of an adult round-trip fare from Port Clinton to Put-in-Bay is $33 for adults and $6 for kids.

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The boat ride to Put-In-Bay was relaxing and lasted about 30 minutes.  The weather was perfect, and the girls really enjoyed taking in the views from the top deck.  Our two year old made it clear the boat ride was her favorite part of the day.  Once docking, we immediately found a spot to rent a golf cart.  There are ample options around the island that are very easy to spot.  We paid a bit more to get a cart rental right next to the boat dock.

From there, we drove to Perry’s monument, and took in some of the historical information posted outside.  You can climb up the stairs of the monument normally, but it was closed for renovations.  There is a also a National Park museum which features a film outside the memorial.  We then drove past the memorial on the coastline.  We found a cool spot to take pictures by the water, and the view was beautiful. We then made our way to our second adventure, Perry’s Cave.

EXPLORING THE CAVES

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The island is home to a few limestone caves formed during the last Ice-Age.  Heineman’s Winery is home to Crystal Cave.  According to their website, “Crystal Cave is the world’s largest geode. . . covered in strontium sulfate, a blueish mineral called celestite.”  During our next trip, we would like to see this cave, because it is supposed to have beautiful formations.

Our family opted to explore Perry’s Cave this visit, which also hosts a family-fun center. Perry’s cave has historical significance in that it provided a well of much needed water source for soldiers during the Battle of Lake Erie.  Native Americans directed Perry to this cave, thereby changing the history of the War. The cave itself is smaller than I imagined, but the kids enjoyed the tour guide’s approachable narrative.  He explained that the water in the cave had turned green due to coins being tossed in wishing well. Unfortunately, some of the formations have been lost due to exploitation of its crystals for profit in past generations.  We then explored the Gem Stone mining station outside.  We decided to buy a sack of dirt and minerals, and they were able to rinse out the dirt in a draining station to reveal their finds.  The girls then made their way to the Fort maze, which was a fun labyrinth for them to escape.

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We drove out to find World of Chocolate nearby and did some window shopping of the various sweets.  We hopped on our golf cart and headed back near the dock and let the kids play in the park near the boat dock.  This park has a beautiful view of the water. Our day ended having lunch near the main strip of the town.

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A view of the park by the waterfront.

Overall, we had a very relaxing day with plenty of new experiences.  If we return to the island next year, we would like to visit the Aquatic Visitors Center on Lake Erie’s South Bass Island near Put-in-Bay.  This center is funded by the Ohio Sea Grant and hosts many events for children, explaining the significance of the preservation of Lake Erie.  Kids can also borrow fishing gear and fish for free.  Another thing we would like to do is visit Gilbratar Island, home to Stone Laboratory and the lookout island for Perry’s troops.  A visit to this island from Put-In-Bay takes some advance planning.

According to the The Ohio State University Sea Grant website,

“Gibraltar Island tours are available from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Wednesdays June 21 – August 9, 2017. Groups tour the island, including Perry’s Lookout, the glacial grooves and Cooke Castle before learning more about Stone Lab research.  Tours can accommodate up to 70 people on a first-come, first-served basis.  Meet at the Boardwalk Restaurant dock, 341 Bayview Ave. Put-in-Bay, Ohio at 10:45 a.m. to attend a tour. $10 per person, $5 for children ages 6-12. The water taxi to Gibraltar Island is $6 round-trip, payable to the boat driver.”

We also have added on our to-do list the The Lake Erie Historical Society’s museum which gives some history of the island.

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Abraham Lincoln’s Birthplace & Boyhood home, Kentucky

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We recently made a visit to the National sites dedicated to Abraham Lincoln in Kentucky.  There are some others in Indiana as well, but these are the earliest.  I highly recommend planning this visit in warmer months, as the most impressive part is touring the grounds.

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Lincoln famously said,

“I was born and have ever remained, in the most humble walks of life.”

His early homes are evidence of that, as they show the typical life of a Frontier family of his time.  Abraham Lincoln’s family moved around quite a bit due to some unforeseen hardships related to instability in the family’s claim to land titles.

His birthplace home and first boyhood home are very close to each other.  The first home was Sinking Spring Farm, a modest and typical Pioneer farm.  The original cabin here was lost, but the National Park Service reconstructed a symbolic cabin here inside a massive stone Memorial Building dedicated in 1911.

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Just below the Memorial Building, you will find a Spring, called “Sinking Spring”.  You can walk down the stone steps to see the Spring well as it appeared in Lincoln’s time.  You can imagine the family using this water source and I was able to explain its importance to my daughters.

The site also has a visitor’s center and the grounds are currently under renovation, it appears to improve the walking paths to the Memorial Building.  The construction site is very clean and did not interfere one bit with our visit, even with little ones running around.  The wooden walkway is beautiful and provides very easy access to the Memorial.

 

The visitor’s center features a film about Lincoln and a reconstruction of the inside of a typical pioneer home.  They also offer Junior Rangers programs, all these things are free of charge.

Just ten miles Northeast of his birthplace cabin, you will find Lincoln’s boyhood home at Knob Creek.

Lincoln once said of Knob Creek,

“I was born February 12, 1809 in Hardin Country, Kentucky.  My earliest recollection, however is of the Knob Creek place.”  (NPS National Historic Park Brochure, 2017).

The lands surrounding this landmark are impressive.  The rolling mountains provide a calming presence, and the lush greenery let’s you imagine life as Lincoln must have experienced it in his boyhood days.  There are some towering trees that provide shade for a moment of reflection.  On this property, you will find a log cabin which has been reconstructed from the wood of the original cabin.

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You will also find a larger structure next to the cabin, once home to a Tavern for traveling visitors.

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There is a beautiful, serene nature at this farm, and it lets you imagine some of Lincoln’s own recollection of his childhood.  The land itself was on 30 acres, with fertile land for crops and a nearby creek often described in Lincoln’s stories.  It was here where he played and almost drowned as a boy.  The Knob Creek area was also home to a Separatist Baptist congregation that disapproved of slavery, and it was probably here where Lincoln began to formulate his later views on slavery.  According to the NPS brochure, Lincoln said that his family, “removed to what is now Spencer Country, Indiana . . .partly on account of slavery. . .” and also on account of eviction due to a prior claim on the land, and relocated to the free state of Indiana.

There is a natural trail along the waters of Knob Creek and a hiking trial giving an overlook of the valley below.  To continue the tour of Lincoln’s life, the National Parks established the Lincoln highway Trail, to follow the family’s route through Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois.

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Locust Grove, Poughkeepsie, NY: Hidden Gem on the Hudson

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Nestled in the Hudson Valley is a historic home and nature preserve called Locust Grove. Once the home of Samuel F. B. Morse, “the Father of the Telegraph” , this mansion is a hidden gem on the Hudson River, that speaks of a bygone era.  In these times, homes were often the center of social life and entertainment.  It is evident that the people who lived here had an appreciation for animals and natural beauty.  The sweeping views are impressive and the mansion’s unique architecture is almost enveloped in a warm embrace by the the nature around it.

The mansion is right on Route 9, hidden from view, and passing it you could easily miss it, because it pushed back from the main road.  I found it one day while driving to Starbucks and was surprised to learn its history.  The grounds are mainly behind the house, so it is awe-striking to actually walk them and see how large the estate really is.  This site is completely worth a Sunday drive.  The estate includes 180 acres, and the grounds boast well maintained trails that are easy enough to walk for a family with children.  The trails take you to a beautiful view of the Hudson river, and include many beautiful nooks and crannies.  Weddings are often hosted on these grounds for its scenic beauty.

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There are several ways to enjoy Locust Grove.  Be sure to tour the large acreage surrounding it, which includes a beautiful hiking trail.

Here are some different ways to enjoy the estate:

1.Take the Mansion Tour.  The mansion itself built in the Italianate style under the direction of the prolific architect, Alexander J Davis, who is famous for introducing many new forms to American architecture.  Davis would later design State capitols and universities (Wikipedia 2016).

2.Explore the Grounds.  Another way to enjoy the estate is to tour the large acreage surrounding it, which includes a beautiful hiking trail and exterior buildings.  Our family chose to forgo paying for admission, and instead we took a tour of the grounds.  The trails have ample visible signage.  These grounds were once only available to the wealthy family that lived here, so it was nice to be able to see them.  The house itself has a beautiful entrance, and you can find a few interesting items.  One is a metal scraper used to scrap mud off boots in the times of Horse and buggy.  Another is the setup of the entrance is intended for horse carriages to be able to drive right up the house.

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You will find a trail behind the house that leads to an ice house, originally used to store ice before the days of refrigeration.  Next to the main house, there is also a carriage house. Walking down the trail, you will come across a small pet cemetery, home to the remains of the many pets the generations of families owned.  You will also see a red stable and wagon barn.  At the end of the trail, you will see commanding views of the Hudson valley and glimpses of the Hudson River train line.

3.Visit the Museum.   The Museum Pavilion explores the life of Samuel Morse as an artist and inventor.  One gallery contains replicas of the early electromagnetic telegraph and information about the Morse code.  This gallery is a great educational resource for children.  My daughter visited this site on a school trip, and the educators talked about how the pulley systems were used to move hay and other materials.  There are quite a few teachable moments available on these grounds.

4.Attend a wine tasting evening.  Locust grove hosts wine tasting paired with artisan food from local chefs on many evenings throughout the year.  The elegance of the location lends itself well to this event, and I think it will be a great date night idea for couples. Guests are given a tour of the mansion, and treated to a Tapas bar for certain events.  The event featured in December (details are below) “Sunset Sensations” is focused on heirloom varieties from the Locust Grove Estate kitchen gardens.

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5.Attend a Holiday Event.  This year, the house is outfitted with Holiday decorations and a special exhibit featuring antique toys and games that belonged to the Youngs, the family that lived beginning in 1901 after the mansion was renovated.

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Details about upcoming events:  Access Museum website link here:

Sunday December 4 – Holiday Open House

Locust Grove’s historic mansion glitters for the holidays with festive decorations and special exhibit from the museum collection; antique toys and games! In 1901 William and Martha Young moved into a newly-renovated house with their two children, Annette (then 16) and Innis (then 14). The Youngs brought trunks of toys with them, and carefully packed them away as their kids grew up. We’ve unpacked them and and brought more than a dozen out for you to see. On December Sundays, take a self-guided tour of Locust Grove’s 25-room mansion. Our expert guides are stationed throughout the house to answer your questions, and we’ll have a fact-filled hunt for kids! $11/adults, $6/kids. 12pm – 4pm.

Thursday December 8 – Sunset Sensations Wine & Food Event

Join us this month for the holiday edition of our wine pairing and food samplings, featuring local chefs! Back for the 11th year, “Sunset Sensations” is inspired by heirloom vegetables from the Locust Grove Estate kitchen gardens. This month guest chef Tomas Monosi of Tomas’ Tapas Bar will create three treats for you to sample, each paired with wines by Kevin Hall of South Side Wine and Spirits. Guests will also be treated to a self-guided tour of the historic mansion, extravagantly decorated for the holidays. 5:30 – 7:30 pm. $32/person, $35 at the the door.

Sunday December 11 – Holiday Open House

Locust Grove’s historic mansion glitters for the holidays with festive decorations and special exhibit from the museum collection; antique toys and games! In 1901 William and Martha Young moved into a newly-renovated house with their two children, Annette (then 16) and Innis (then 14). The Youngs brought trunks of toys with them, and carefully packed them away as their kids grew up. We’ve unpacked them and and brought more than a dozen out for you to see. On December Sundays, take a self-guided tour of Locust Grove’s 25-room mansion. Our expert guides are stationed throughout the house to answer your questions, and we’ll have a fact-filled hunt for kids! $11/adults, $6/kids. 12pm – 4pm.

Thursday December 15 – Sunset Sensations Wine & Food Event

Join us this month for the holiday edition of our wine pairing and food samplings, featuring local chefs! Back for the 11th year, “Sunset Sensations” is inspired by heirloom vegetables from the Locust Grove Estate kitchen gardens. This month guest chef Michael Polasek of Bluestone Bistro will create three treats for you to sample, each paired with wines by Kevin Hall of South Side Wine and Spirits. Guests will also be treated to a self-guided tour of the historic mansion, extravagantly decorated for the holidays. 5:30 – 7:30 pm. $32/person, $35 at the the door.

Sunday December 18 – Holiday Open House

Locust Grove’s historic mansion glitters for the holidays with festive decorations and special exhibit from the museum collection; antique toys and games! In 1901 William and Martha Young moved into a newly-renovated house with their two children, Annette (then 16) and Innis (then 14). The Youngs brought trunks of toys with them, and carefully packed them away as their kids grew up. We’ve unpacked them and and brought more than a dozen out for you to see. On December Sundays, take a self-guided tour of Locust Grove’s 25-room mansion. Our expert guides are stationed throughout the house to answer your questions, and we’ll have a fact-filled hunt for kids! $11/adults, $6/kids. 12pm – 4pm.

December 26-31 – Holiday House Tours

Locust Grove’s historic mansion glitters for the holidays with festive decorations and special exhibit from the museum collection; antique toys and games! In 1901 William and Martha Young moved into a newly-renovated house with their two children, Annette (then 16) and Innis (then 14). The Youngs brought trunks of toys with them, and carefully packed them away as their kids grew up. We’ve unpacked them and and brought more than a dozen out for you to see. On Thanksgiving weekend, enjoy guided tours with our expert guides on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Tours begin at 10:15 and the last tour leaves at 3:15. $11/person, $6/child.

Below is information from the museum website about open times for the different aspects:

Locust Grove Visitor Center

Locust Grove website: http://www.lgny.org/visiting

Open every day from 10 am – 5 pm

Locust Grove Mansion Tours  (Mansion open by guided tour only)

May 1 – November 30, Guided tours offered daily

April and December, Guided tours offered on Saturday and Sunday

Tour departure times:

10:15am • 11:30am • 12:45pm • 2:00pm • 3:15pm
Tour fee:  $11 Adults,  $6 Youths (6-18)

Locust Grove Gardens & Grounds

8:00 AM to dusk, year-round

Interested in wedding photos or group photos? As of January 1, 2017, a permit will be required for all wedding and other group events.

Locust Lawn Farm and
Terwilliger House
Open by appointment for groups of 10 or more.  Please call 845.454.4500 x 211 or email k.snodgrass@lgny.org for more information.

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Fort Ancient, Oregonia, Ohio

SAMSUNG CSCA recent, memorable drive was our visit to Fort Ancient on the Miami River valley.  The Fort Ancient State Memorial is on the National Register of Historic Places, due to its importance in telling the story of Native cultures in America.  The site contains original earthen mounds and a plateau enclosed by large “embankment walls” built by Hopewell Indians.  According to the museum website, “The Hopewell, known for their engineering expertise, built these walls and many other features both within the enclosure and on the steep valleys that surround the site: conical and crescent-shaped mounds, limestone pavements and circles, and many subsurface elements that are currently coming to light.. . ”

Recently, the site was nominated for consideration to the UNESCO World Heritage list for its importance.

Three sites in Ohio that have received nominations, among them Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks,  Serpent Mound and the Dayton Aviation Sites (Worldheritageohio.org, 2016), all worth visiting.  There is a trail of ancient sites available here with more detailed information, for those who would like to see all of these types of sites from Ancient Ohio.

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An outdoor gallery showing different styles of Native American homes and gardens featuring plants used in daily life.

The Hopewell lived from 200 BC to AD 500, along fertile rivers in the Northeast and Midwest, as the map below shows (Wikipedia, 2016).  The mounds are part of the Woodland period and scientists believe they were used for ceremonials purposes (World Hertiage Ohio, Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks, 2016).

Walking these hiking trials and seeing the mounds up close, our family felt a connection to the history of these lands.  These mounds provide a glimpse into the world of ancient civilizations that were so connected to the land, as a form of sustenance and reverence.

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The drive to Fort Ancient is beautiful in its own right, as it is located on the banks for the Miami River on winding roads and close to many zip-lining and kayaking areas.  The natural habitat provokes a sense of peace and respect for people who lived thousands of years ago.

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Most hiking trails at Fort Ancient are kid friendly.  Be sure to grab a map before venturing out.  Maps are avaliable at the museum and show the difficulty of different trails.

The embankment walls are a cause of archaeological debate, as they are said have no defense relevance.  The mounds are said to be of ceremonial importance.

According to World Hertiage Ohio,

“The Fort Ancient Hilltop Enclosure is the largest and best-preserved structure of its kind in the world. Three miles of sinuous earthen embankments include 67 stone-lined gateways, and are accompanied by a continuous necklace of clay-lined ponds. Pairs of mounds create three distinctive monumental gateways; four other stone-covered mounds form a perfect square aligned to solar and lunar events”(World Hertiage Ohio, Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks, 2016).

Others believe they may have served dual purposes.  According to AncientOhioTrail, “Professor Ken Tankersley of the University of Cincinnati has recently argued that the construction of these so-called “forts” had much to do with water management, and also that this design was more extensive than what was recorded on the best-known nineteenth-century map.”   Seeing the site up close, allows one to judge what they may have been used for.  Our family walked by several sites where mounds where still evident in the landscape and  others where man-made ponds once stood.

Another similar Hopewell site worth noting, The Earthworks at Newark Ohio,  “include the 1200-foot-diameter Great Circle with its steep inner ditch and monumental framed gateway, plus the Octagon Earthworks – a perfect circle and adjoining octagon over a half-mile across – whose perfectly formed, eye-level embankments align with all eight of the key rise- and set-points of the moon during its 18.6-year cycle, within a smaller margin of error than that at Stonehenge. . . “(World Heritage Ohio, 2016).

The museum offers a great overview of the daily life of Native Americans.  It is a great way to introduce a history of Native American cultures to children.

My kids really enjoyed the exhibits, which are excellent teaching resources.  The picture above shows my girls considering how daily life played out, using an artistic recreation of the village at Fort Ancient.

The museum has several galleries dedicated to understanding the archaeology and history of Native peoples.  The museum also teaches how archaeological evidence is obtained.  The historical galleries go in chronological order, up until the era of European contact.

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There is one section that serves as a learning center, where kids can play with instruments, touch common tools, and try on traditional clothing.  I really appreciated a wall dedicated to a timeline (pictured below), which showed different aspects of everyday life according to time period.  The gallery does an excellent job distinguishing the differences in lifestyle, while making it kid-friendly for all ages.  This gave my children an understanding of the diversity of cultures over time.  This gallery was appropriate for all ages. Even my two year old found it engaging, as she found some instruments to play with.

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Fort Ancient includes both a museum that gives a historical overview of Native cultures in America and the Earthworks, the prehistoric hill top enclosures.  In addition, Fort Ancient has two sister sites in Dayton, including SunWatch Indian Village/Archaeological Park which brings to life Fort Ancient culture though a partial Village reconstruction and interpretive center (Fort Ancient website).  The other is the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery.  The Dayton Society of Natural History membership allows access to all these sites.

On a final note, it is imperative that the public support the efforts to preserve these sites so they are not lost for future generations, by visiting or writing letters to congress in support for UNESCO consideration.  The visit is definetly worth the time, and gives families with children a deeper understanding of Native American history.